Programs in Architectural & Building Construction Technology


Course Catalog


Institute of Design and Construction

The Institute of Design and Construction is a private non-profit institution accredited by the New York State Board of Regents and is authorized to confer degrees of Associate in Occupational Studies.

IDC's programs are registered by the New York State Education Department - the Office of Higher Education and the Office of the Professions. 

To contact the New York State Education Department:
Office of College and University Evaluation
89 Washington Avenue, 5 North Mezzanine
Albany, NY  12234
p: 518-474-5889


 

Table of Contents

Academic Responsibility
Academic Standards - State and Federal Financial Aid Programs
Academic Year
Admissions
Administration

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR)

Advanced Placement
AOS Architectural Technology
AOS Building Construction Technology
APTS
Architectural License Review Program
Attendance
Billing
Board of Trustees

Books/Supplies

Building Design
Bulletin Changes Posted on Website
Cancellation of Course
Change of Address or Telephone
Cheating and Plagiarism

Concurrent Enrollment
Conduct
Course Descriptions

Constitution Day
Credit Hour
Crime on Campus
Curriculum Requirements
Directions to IDC
Drug Free Workplace Policy
Equal Opportunity
Faculty
Final Examinations
Financial Aid
Financial Information
Financial Responsibility
Foreign Students
Grade Point Average Calculations

Grading System
Graduation Requirements
Grievance Procedure
History
Housing
How Tuition Charges Are Determined
Immunization Requirements
Impact of Withdrawal on Financial Aid

Job Placement

Non-Matriculated (Non-degree) Status
Payment Options
Pell Grants, TAP
Placement Tests
Policy on Sexual Harassment
Programs of Study
Protection of Privacy
Refunds
Registration Procedure
Release of Records
Retention and Graduation Rates
Returned Checks
Seminars for Professionals

Smoking
Social Security Number
Student Access to Educational

Students with Disabilities

Records
Student Budgets
Transcripts
Transfer Credit
Veterans

William D. Ford Direct Loan Program

Withdrawal from Classes
Withdrawal Refund Schedule

 

Board of Trustees
Paula Alleva
Sabina Anselmo

Margaret M. Battista
Michael Galeno

Robert Gorski, R.A.
Maryann Kellogg
Vincent Stebbins

 

Administration

Executive Director
Vincent C. Battista, B. Arch., R.A.

Director of Communications
Elizabeth Battista, B.S., M.A.

Bursar
Ruth A. Davis, B.A.

Assistant Director of Financial Aid
Giovanny Santana, B.A.

Librarian
Robert Wagner, B.A., M.A., M.S.

Office Manager
Valerie Heard, A.O.S.

Administrative Assistant
Grace Mateo

Maintenance Superintendents
Keith Jones
Edward Speller

 

Institutional Mission

Since 1947, the purpose of the Institute has been to serve the building construction industry by dedicating itself to programs of instruction that deal with the real world of construction.

The mission of the Institute is to provide the highest quality technical education at a reasonable cost to the student.

The goal of the Institute is to prepare individuals for meaningful employment in the construction industry, while giving them the incentive to continue their education on a higher level.

The implementation of these objectives is achieved through a structured program of study, small classes, and a professional teaching staff.

Top of Page ^

History

The Institute of Design and Construction (IDC) is a private, non-profit institution registered by the New York State Department of Education, accredited by the New York State Board of Regents and authorized to confer Associate Degrees in Occupational Studies.

IDC was founded in 1947 by Vito P. Battista, R.A. and is located in downtown Brooklyn. Its primary goal is to offer undergraduate and professional training, and to prepare individuals for the building construction industry.

The Institute began as an evening school in December 1947 at 26 Court Street in Brooklyn. Approximately 100 students enrolled with eight instructors teaching 11 subjects.

In 1952, the Institute's courses of study were approved by the Veterans Administration. In January of 1955, the Institute was organizationally changed to a not-for-profit institution and received a provisional charter for its curriculum leading to a Certificate in Architecture and a Certificate in Engineering. In September 1955, the Institute purchased a landmark church building at 311 Bridge Street. By then, the Institute had an enrollment of approximately 450 students with 35 instructors teaching 58 subjects.

In 1968, the Institute purchased the American Law Book building at 141 Willoughby Street, its present location.

In January of 1974, IDC was authorized by the New York State Board of Regents to confer Associate Degrees of Occupational Studies (A.O.S.) in Architectural Technology, Building Construction Technology, and Building Systems Design Technology. That same year, the school was approved for the Basic Education Opportunity Grant (BEOG) Program (now Pell Grant Program) by the United States Office of Education. The New York State Department of Education approved IDC for the Tuition Assistance Program and training of veterans.

The Institute of Design and Construction was granted an Absolute Charter of complete and permanent college status in March of 1975.

The Institute is a pioneer in the educational program now known as the "Work and Study Plan."  This full-time day program was started in 1952 and consists of two semesters of accelerated course study in the architectural and building construction fields. At the end of the first year, students work during the day and return to evening school to complete their training toward an Associate Degree in Occupational Studies. This Work/Study program requires a minimum of 2 1/2 years to complete. The evening school program requires a minimum of three years to complete. In 1997, IDC added an Interior Design major to its Architectural Technology program.

IDC's day program has made available an architectural or construction education to talented students in the shortest possible time, and makes an education in these fields attainable for students who are unable to afford a full-time university education. The school graduates highly trained individuals who meet the demands of the building construction industry.

IDC maintains a free placement service for its students and has achieved an excellent reputation for supplying highly prepared personnel to architectural, interior design, construction, and engineering firms. Employers contact the placement office with job opportunities and our administrative staff assists in arranging interviews. IDC does not guarantee any jobs or placements.

Top of Page ^

Architectural License Review Program

Since 1947, the Institute has been offering courses, seminars and programs to prepare candidates for the National Council of Architectural Registration Board's Architectural Registration Examination (ARE®). These programs are non-credit, non-degree and highly specialized. Separate courses covering all divisions of the ARE® are offered between September and May. Course offerings include dry runs for the Architectural Graphics sections. For additional information, request the bulletin on Architectural License Review Programs.

Top of Page ^

Programs of Study

Programs leading to Associate Degrees in Occupational Studies are available for Architectural Technology (Hegis Code 5304) and Building Construction Technology (Hegis Code 5317).

Top of Page ^

Admissions

All new students must submit an Application for Admissions together with a non-refundable application fee. All students who wish to matriculate must have a high school diploma or General Education Diploma (GED) equivalent and submit evidence of such. Applicants who do not have a high school diploma or equivalent may register as non-matriculated students (non-degree). All students born on or after January 1, 1957 who register for six or more credits must provide written evidence of immunity against measles, mumps and rubella or receive an exemption for medical or religious reasons.  Effective August 1, 2003, New York State Public Health Law requires that all students taking 6 or more credits must confirm receipt of receiving information regarding meningococcal meningitis immunizations. Students will be issued appropriate forms at registration.

Prior to enrolling, applicants are invited to meet or call the Director of Admissions to ask specific questions about the Institute and its programs. The telephone number is 718-855-3661.

Top of Page ^

Transfer Credit

Students who wish to transfer credits from another institution must submit official transcripts from all previously attended colleges for course evaluation. Maximum transfer allowed is 12 credits.

Top of Page ^

Advanced Placement

Students who have extensive experience, especially in graphics classes, may apply for advanced placement. Advanced placement only waives a specific class or classes, but students must fulfill the Associate Degree program requirement of 72 credits. Maximum advanced placement allowed is 12 credits.

Top of Page ^

Registration Procedure

Students receive registration information before the beginning of each registration period. All students must register during the period indicated on the Institute's academic calendar. Registration procedures are the same for both degree candidates and non-matriculated students. Students are advised to register on a timely basis to avoid closed classes and late registration fees. All applicants must fill out and sign the Enrollment Agreement. In order to validate registration, a non-refundable registration fee must be submitted with the total semester's tuition. Re-enrolling students registering during the posted late registration period must include an additional late registration fee. New students are not subject to the late registration fee. Returning matriculated students registering after an absence of one or more semesters must include at the time of registration an additional re-matriculation fee.

Top of Page ^

Non-Matriculated (Non-Degree) Status

Applicants who wish to take classes on a non-credit basis may do so as non-matriculated students. Courses taken on a non-matriculated basis cannot be used for Associate Degree credit.

Withdrawal from Classes

If a student must withdraw from the Institute for a valid reason, he or she must apply in person to the Administrative Office for permission to do so. Only in approved instances, where personal illness or other compelling circumstances interfere, can withdrawal be accomplished by mail. Students who wish to withdraw from any class or classes MUST file a Change of Program Form, signed by the student and received by the Administration Office. Students who withdraw from any class within the first seven weeks of the semester will received a grade of W (Withdrew). After the first seven weeks, students who are passing may withdraw with a grade of WP (Withdrew Passing) or if failing with a grade of WF (Withdrew Failing). See Attendance Policy.

Retention and Graduation Rates

IDC has an admissions policy of open access, one that gives opportunity to students with varying abilities to succeed in higher education. Since IDC's programs are designed for students to work and study simultaneously, graduation rates vary considerably. Some students, having received the necessary skills for employment, may not be as willing to graduate in a predetermined amount of time as would a student who attends a traditional college. Many students who do not graduate still possess highly recognized, marketable skills that offer employment advantages. The majority of students attending IDC are not full-time but part-time. Many are currently working within the construction industry and are upgrading their skills for job advancement.

Graduation Rates

Fall Semester

Cohort

2 Year Rate

3 Year Rate

4 Year Rate

2010

15

0

6.6%

Not Available

2009

31

0

9.7%

6.5%

2008

9*

0

0

11.1%

2007

10

0

0

0

*In 2008, the cohort was adjusted from 10 students to 9 students due to a student death.

Graduation rates are based upon first-time full-time students.  Cohort graduation rates are quite small, so this data should be approached with some caution.  Multiple cohorts are enrolled at any one time, suppressing the ratio of degrees to enrollment. 

Additionally, IDC’s Associate Degree programs are 72 credits, while most Associate Degree programs are only 60 credits (2 year programs).  In order to complete the 72 credits, IDC students require an additional semester of classes.  For our standard sequence of courses for an Associate Degree in Architectural Technology and Building Construction Technology, the published minimum time for students to graduate taking day and evening classes is five semesters or two and a half years (this is due to the fact that the last three semesters are exclusively done in the evening).  The published minimum time for students to graduate taking only evening classes is six semesters or three years.  This assumes students take the MAXIMUM amount of credits each semester, which most IDC students do not take. 

Retention Rates

Fall Semester

Cohort

1 Year Rate

2 Year Rate

3 Year Rate

2010

15

47%

40%

20%

2009

31

45%

32%

25.8%

2008

9*

66.7%

55.5%

11%

2007

10

33.3%

10%

10%

*In 2008, the cohort was adjusted from 10 students to 9 students due to a student death.

Retention rates are based upon first-time full-time students.  The number of first-time full-time students is extremely small, thus the loss of a handful of students can heavily skew retention and persistence rates.  

 

Job Placement*

At IDC, we provide current students (who have completed 24 to 30 credits and are in good academic standing) and alumni with the tools to help them succeed in finding a meaningful career in the building construction industry. 

Job Placement can provide students with the following:

  • Career goal guidance
  • Developing resumes, cover letters and thank you letters
  • Finding and applying for employment*
  • Interviewing guidance

*PLEASE NOTE: IDC does NOT guarantee job placement.

Job Placement Statistics:

In 2012 - 2013, approximately 65 students had completed more than 24 credits at IDC, which is the minimum requirement for job placement. Over 57% were identified as presently working in the building construction industry.  Of the remaining students eligible for job placement, 25% were placed through IDC's Job Placement opportunities. IDC students who completed over 24 credits and were working in the field of architecture and/or construction was 68%.  Please note: These are estimates built from data provided on the IDC application and from students sharing good news with the administrative office that they are working in the field (through IDC’s job placement or job placement on their own). 

 

Housing

The Institute does not provide any housing or dormitory facilities.

Top of Page ^

Billing

All tuition and fees are to be paid to the Bursar's Office unless otherwise indicated. All checks should be made payable to the Institute of Design and Construction.

Top of Page ^

How Tuition Charges are Determined

Tuition charges are determined by multiplying the total number of credits taken per semester by the current credit hour rate. Each remedial course (non-credit) is considered 3 tuition credits.

Top of Page ^

Financial Responsibility

Tuition Liability: Upon selecting and reserving courses, you become responsible for all tuition and fees associated with that registration. You must officially drop or withdraw from classes in order to remove or reduce tuition liability. Your liability will not automatically be voided for non-attendance or non-payment.

The Institute may exercise its rights to deny future services to a student who does not make proper payment arrangements. The Institute also reserves the right to report any delinquency to a credit reporting agency and to refer an account to an outside agency for collection or legal action. All collection costs incurred by the Institute become the responsibility of the student.

Top of Page ^

Payment Options

How To Pay: Payment should be made by check, money order, bank check, credit card, or cash.

Financial Aid: Financial aid can be used toward payment of a student's bill provided that the aid has been officially awarded by the Administration Office and accepted by the student. A student will not receive credit for a student loan until the complete loan application has been received and verified by the Institute.

It is the student's responsibility to ensure that all financial aid is credited to his/her account. The student will be responsible for tuition due.

Students receiving sponsorship from government agencies, employers or other organizations must provide the Institute with proof of coverage and permission to bill the third party directly. The student will be required to pay or make arrangements for payment of any uncovered portion of the bill. Sponsorship is an arrangement between the student and the third party and does not absolve the student of the debt to the Institute should the third party not pay as promised.

Top of Page ^

Refunds

In general, when there is a credit on a student's account, a refund will be generated within 14 days. Refunds for overpayment or disbursement of financial aid will be processed automatically. Students entitled to refunds from withdrawal should see the Bursar to begin the refund process.

All refund checks are mailed to the student's most current address or can be picked up in the Bursar's Office upon notification that the refund has been processed. Checks in excess of $2,000.00 will be sent Certified Mail. Checks will be held in the office by special request only.

Refund of Tuition/Reduction of Liability: The following refund schedules refer to adjustments to tuition charges only. A refund or reduction of tuition liability does not guarantee a student a cash refund. Adjustments to tuition liability may affect a student's financial aid package and any cash refunds must be approved by the Administration Office. The Bursar's Office will refund any credit remaining or bill for the remaining balance due once all adjustments have been made to the student's account.

Tuition Refund Schedules: Upon registration a student assumes full liability for the semester's tuition and fees. Whenever a student submits the proper written notification of withdrawal or drop to the Administration Office, the student's tuition charges are adjusted according to the following refund schedule.

Top of Page ^

Withdrawal Refund Schedule

Tuition Liability
Prior to the first day of semester: 0%
First week of semester 20%
Second week of semester 40%
Third week of semester 60%
Fourth week of semester 75%
After fourth week of semester 100%

The above refund schedule applies only to the first four weeks of the semester. It is based on the official starting date of the semester not on the number of class sessions held or attended. Students desiring to drop courses in order to qualify for a 100% tuition refund may do so at any time prior to the first day of classes.

Top of Page ^

Impact of Withdrawal on Financial Aid

The Institute of Design and Construction has adopted the Federal Refund Policy to comply with new federal regulations (section 668.22) of the Higher Education Amendments of 1998. In accordance with federal regulations, students who withdraw from the Institute and have Federal Title IV financial assistance (Federal William D. Ford Loan, Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students or Federal Pell Grant) that have been credited or could have been credited to their tuition account will be subject to the Federal Refund Policy regarding the possible return of Title IV funds awarded. Also, the amount of refundable institutional charges will be determined based upon IDC's policy.

The amount of the semester's Federal Title IV that has been earned by the student (as a result of the prorated amount of time the student has been in school for the semester) will be eligible for retention on the student's behalf. Any Federal Title IV aid that is not earned must be returned to its source. The amounts to be returned to the Federal Programs will vary based upon the type of program, the total amount to be returned, and the government's determination of the order in which aid is returned to the various programs. If there is a student account balance resulting from these adjustments, the student is responsible for payment.

When returning Federal Title IV aid, federally mandated priority listing will be used:

  1. Federal Unsubsidized William D. Ford Student Loan Program
  2. Federal Subsidized William D. Ford Student Loan Program
  3. Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS)
  4. Federal Pell Grant

 

A written outline of the Federal Refund Policy, along with federal worksheets and sample refund calculations are available upon request in the Administration Office.

The calculation for impact of withdrawal on financial aid is the same for all students. The determination of tuition refund is based on length of attendance.

Top of Page ^

Returned Checks

A $20 fee is charged for any check that cannot be successfully negotiated.

Any student who has more than two checks returned by the bank will no longer be able to submit payment by personal check. Stopping payment on a check does not remove your legal liability to pay for tuition charges and does not constitute a withdrawal from the Institute.

The Institute reserves the right to withhold transcripts, diplomas, and other services, including registration, from students whose financial obligations have not been fully met.

Top of Page ^

Financial Information (Effective July 1, 2012)

Schedule of Tuition and Fees:
Application Fee: $30.00
Application Fee International Students $100.00
Tuition (per credit) $340.00
Registration Fee per Semester $40.00
Late Registration Fee* $60.00
Re-matriculation Fee** $30.00
Make-up Exam Fee per Exam $50.00
Technology Fee per Semester $100.00
Returned Check Fee $20.00
Graduation Fee per Degree $40.00

*A late registration fee will be charged to all re-enrolling students who register during the late registration period. First time students are not subject to the late registration fee. Students taking special non-credit architect registration review courses are exempt.

**A re-matriculation fee is charged to any returning student matriculating who is re-admitted to the Institute after an absence of one or more semesters.

Students are responsible for all additional costs if an unpaid balance must be forwarded to a third party collection agency. These costs include (but not limited to) agency fees, interest and court costs. In addition, non payment or a default judgment against a student account may be reported to a credit bureau and reflected in the students' credit report.

Top of Page ^

Financial Aid

The major financial aid programs are the Pell Grant Program, the New York State Tuition Assistance Program (TAP), and the William D. Ford Direct Loan Program. All students requesting financial aid must file a free application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for federal, state, and loan programs. All financial aid is based on need as determined by the FASFA data. Only matriculated students are eligible to receive financial aid and all recipients must meet the guidelines of need for each program.

Information regarding how to apply for financial aid is available below and in the Administration Office. All programs must be applied for annually, and continued eligibility must be maintained by meeting minimum academic standards. Students are responsible for being aware of filing deadlines as published on applications. Students who are in default of a William D. Ford Direct Loan are not eligible for financial aid.

All financial aid applicants should refer to the current year Financial Aid Student Guide published by the U.S. Department of Education, which is available in the Administration Office.

Top of Page ^

Pell Grants

A federal Pell Grant is a financial aid award that does not have to be repaid.  Pell Grants are available for matriculating students who meet the financial need guidelines of the program. U.S. citizenship or permanent residence status is required.  As of July 1, 2013, eligibility for the Pell Grant is limited to 12 terms of full time payments or its equivalent.  

All students applying for a Pell Grant must submit a FASFA to the Federal Processor and IDC must receive a complete and valid document by the last date of the enrollment period. Any report received after the last date of the enrollment period will not be considered a valid document (in approximately 1 week, you should receive notification Student Aid Report of a possible award).  Awards are based upon an Estimated Family Contribution (EFC) and can range up to $5645 per year for full time study.  An EFC of 0000 will result in the maximum award. 

In order for a Pell Grant to be processed, you must submit the following documentation along with your Student Aid Report (ALL Student Aid Reports which are processed through the IDC Financial Aid office are verified for correct information). This documentation must be submitted before any award can be disbursed.

1.  A completed Verification Worksheet for 2013-14

2.  A signed copy of your 2012 Income Tax Form – including W-2 forms

3.  Documentation of untaxed income (if applicable)

4.  If you were born after January 1, 1989 - a signed copy of your 

     parents' 2012 income tax forms – including W-2 forms

5.  Proof of any other income reported on the Pell Grant application

6.  Proof of permanent residency, if you are a non-citizen

7.  Any other documentation requested by the Financial Aid Office

Pell Grants will not be processed until all the required documentation is submitted and is correct. Student Aid Reports should be submitted during the academic year. Awards will also be based upon your enrollment status, on the date that you submit your valid Student Aid Report, and all the necessary documentation.

 

Top of Page ^

Tuition Assistance Program

TAP awards are issued to New York State residents who are enrolled full time in a degree-granting program study and meet the income criteria.  Students must apply for TAP awards on a yearly basis. If eligible, the maximum annual award is $4000.

To be eligible for a TAP award a student must:

* Be a United States citizen or eligible noncitizen.

* Be a resident of New York.

* Study full time undergraduate (at least 12 credits per semester) at

   an approved postsecondary institution in New York.

*Graduated from high school in the United States or earned a GED.

* Be matriculated in an approved program of study and be in good

   academic standing. Have at least a cumulative "C" average as of

   the 2nd semester payment.

* Be charged at least $200 tuition per year.

* Not be in default on any state or federal student loans and not be

   in default on any repayment of State awards.

* Meet income requirement.

TAP awards are made based upon the following income limits:

* Dependent undergraduate students, or independent students who

   are married and have tax dependents, or independent students

   who are unmarried and have tax dependents - $80,000 NYS taxable

   income.

* Independent undergraduate students who are married and have no

   other tax dependents - $40,000 NYS taxable income.

* Single independent undergraduate students with no tax

   dependents - $10,000 NYS taxable income.

Students who are New York State residents applying for TAP must do so by first filling out the FASFA . You will be able to link to your online TAP application at the end of the FASFA session.  For more information, students can contact the Financial Aid Office or visit the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation website.

The Financial Aid Office may also request additional documentation from students before an award can be processed or tuition credit be issued. Examples of additional documentation can be: proof of NY State residency for one year prior to the beginning of an award year; proof of US permanent residency; proof of financial independence status for students under 23 years old. Please refer to the specific TAP notice for important particulars.

Eligible students may receive up to 6 TAP awards as an Associate Degree candidate. This maximum is a cumulative amount and includes any previous TAP payments you may have received at previously attended schools; thus if you received 2 TAP payments at a previous school, you will be eligible to receive only 4 semesters eligibility at IDC.

Top of Page ^

William D. Ford Direct Loan Program

Direct Loans can be obtained through the U.S. Department of Education. All loan applicants must have filed a Master Promissory Note and completed entrance counseling at www.studentloans.gov. Loans are based on need and consider a family contribution as defined by the U.S. Department of Education. All students who are applying for a Direct Loan must first apply for and receive notifications from the Pell Grant and TAP programs. A determination of need is then based upon the total budget for attendance at IDC for the year less any financial aid. If there is still an unmet need, then a loan request with an amount requested (not to exceed the allowable limits) can be processed. In applying for a loan, the student MUST keep in mind that LOANS MUST BE PAID BACK WITH INTEREST! Loan recipients must begin repayment 6 months after graduation or if not attending school at least on a half time basis. 

The maximum loan for first time dependent student is $5500 per year. The maximum loan for a first time independent student is $9500 per year.  Loans are usually disbursed in four payments, twice each semester. First time students will not receive loan proceeds until a minimum of 30 days after the beginning date of the semester.  All financial aid received cannot exceed the cost of attendance.  If you have any questions regarding loans, please contact the Financial Aid Office.

Extreme prudence should be exercised when applying for a loan.  We do not recommend applying for a loan unless it is absolutely necessary. Before applying for a loan, you must meet with a financial aid counselor for entrance counseling, to discuss your status and obligations of repayment.  You will be required to have an exit interview after you leave school to review your obligation and responsibility.

 

Top of Page ^

Aid To Part-Time Study (APTS)

This program is similar to TAP, except that it is for students registered for 3-11 credits. APTS is the primary mode used for students close to finishing their degree requirements.  IDC has very limited funds that are available for this program. Applications can be obtained in the Financial Aid Office and students who have exceptional need should apply. You must also apply for TAP for income verification purposes. Awards cannot exceed tuition costs and cannot exceed the total of other state, federal, and non-governmental aid, which the Commissioner of Education determines to be duplicative of the part time award.

Top of Page ^

Academic Standards

Pell Grant and Aid to Part-Time Students measure progress by credits attempted.

TAP awards are based on the number of payments received. In order to receive the TAP payment, a student must maintain a standard of progress.  Please contact the Financial Aid Office for more information on the standard of progress.

Pursuit is the completion of courses with grades of A, B, C, D or F. Credits completed is the completion of courses with grades of A, B, C or D.

Note: Students who receive a TAP award and withdraw from all classes in the same semester are not eligible for a TAP award the next semester in which they qualify for an award.

Top of Page ^

Grading System

A Excellent
B Very Good
C Average
D Minimum Passing
F Failure
FA Failure due to absences
FX Failure, repeated course
W Withdrew
WP Withdrew, Passing
WF Withdrew, Failing

W and WP are issued when a student withdraws from a course while doing satisfactory work.

WF is issued when a student withdraws from a course while doing unsatisfactory work and a WF is included in the student's cumulative average.

For students who are repeating courses, the following policy is effective for all courses taken after January 1, 1992. A student may retake a course previously failed and request a grade of FX. Only the second grade in that course will count in the determination of a grade point average. The transcript will show both grades; the original will be marked FX. A student may exercise this option no more than once for a given course and for no more than two courses totaling no more than six credits.

Top of Page ^

Credit Hour

The unit of credit is the credit hour. A credit hour represents 50 minutes of instruction per week per semester. Each semester hour requires a minimum of two hours per week of private study or homework.

Top of Page ^

Grade Point Average Calculations

Grade Point Average (GPA) and Quality Points: Quality points are computed by multiplying the credits times the grade point, where A = 4.0; B = 3.0; C = 2.0; D = 1.0; F = 0.0; WF = 0.0; FA = 0.0

The semester grade point average is computed by dividing the number of quality points by the number of credits taken. Grades of W and WP do not affect the semester GPA. Cumulative GPA is the total number of quality points earned divided by the total number of credits attempted.

Students must earn a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in order to graduate. Effective for students entering after January 1, 1992; to graduate, students must have a GPA of 2.0 in all work, and a GPA of 2.0 in their major.

Top of Page ^

Cheating and Plagiarism

IDC’s policy on cheating and plagiarism is that the student will automatically fail the exam/assignment and the student may be expelled.  

Top of Page

 

Academic Year

An academic year is from July 1 to June 30. Classes are scheduled on a semester basis consisting of 15 weeks. Semesters are scheduled in the Fall and Spring of each academic year. The Fall semester usually starts in the beginning of September and the Spring semester starts in the beginning of February. Consult the current academic calendar for specific semester registration and starting dates.

Top of Page ^

Foreign Students

IDC is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant students. All non-immigrant students applying for F-1 status must conform to the following Immigration and Naturalization Service requirements: (1) all students must pursue a full-time course of study; and complete the program within a 30 month time period; (2) all students must have sufficient financial resources to maintain student status; (3) the student cannot be engaged in off-campus employment without authorization of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS); (4) the student must not be engaged in any activities deemed inconsistent with continued presence in the United States as a student.

For additional information, visit the U.S. Department of State website

Foreign students' secondary school diplomas need to be evaluated by in order for acceptance by IDC.  For acceptable evaluation services, please use one of recommended agencies below.

Center for Applied Research, Evaluation & Education, Inc.

International Evaluation Service

P.O. Box 18358

Anaheim, CA 92817

Phone: (714) 237-9272

Fax: (714) 237- 9279

Web: http://www.iescaree.com

Evaluation Service, Inc.
333 W. North Avenue #284
Chicago, IL 60610-1293
847-477-8569
312-587-3068 (fax)
http://www.evaluationservice.net

Globe Language Services
305 Broadway
Suite 401
New York, NY 10007
212-227-1994
212-693-1489 (fax)
http://www.globelanguage.com

Josef Silny & Associates, Inc.
International Education Consultants
7101 SW 102 Avenue
Miami, FL 33173
305-273-1616
305-273-1338 (fax)
http://www.jsilny.com

World Education Services
Bowling Green Station
PO Box 5087
New York, NY 10274-5087
212-966-6311
212-739-6100 (fax)
http://www.wes.org/

 

Top of Page ^

Veterans

IDC is approved by the New York State Education Department for the training of veterans. Veterans should contact the Administration Office for further information regarding benefits or visit www.gibill.va.gov.

Top of Page ^

Equal Opportunity

IDC's policy is to provide equal opportunity in educational programs, admissions and employment to all persons without regard to race, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, affectional preference, or marital status.

Top of Page ^

Students with Disabilities

IDC accommodates students with disabilities in all matters possible. Students with disabilities (both physical and learning) are encouraged to discuss their circumstances so that special arrangements can be made if necessary.

Top of Page ^

Immunization Requirements

New York State law requires that all matriculating students who were born on or after January 1, 1957 and who are taking six credits or more must show proof of immunity. Proof of immunity consists of:

Measles – two doses of live measles vaccine (the first administered after 12 months of age, and the second after 15 months of age and at least 30 days after the first), physician's documentation of measles disease, or a blood test showing immunity. Vaccines given before 1968 are not acceptable.

Mumps – one dose of live mumps vaccine administered after 12 months of age, physician's documentation of mumps disease, or a blood test showing immunity. Vaccines given before 1969 are not acceptable.

Rubella – one dose of live rubella vaccine administered after 12 months of age or a blood test showing immunity. Vaccines given before 1969 are not acceptable.

Proof of U.S. elementary or high school attendance since 1980 and a recent MMR (all above in one) vaccination will satisfy this requirement.

Students must comply with this regulation within 30 days of the starting date of the semester, or they will not be permitted to attend class.

Effective August 1, 2003, New York State Public Health Law requires that all students taking 6 or more credits must confirm receipt of receiving information regarding meningococcal meningitis immunizations. Students will be issued appropriate forms at registration.

Top of Page ^

Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR)

The Institute is approved for students who are sponsored by the New York State Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services - Vocational Rehabilitation.

Top of Page ^

Placement Tests

All matriculating students taking Applied Mathematics must take a placement test in mathematics. Students who do not achieve a passing grade will be required to take and pass the non-credit Introduction to Mathematics course prior to taking Applied Mathematics. The Institute also requires that all students taking Building Materials and Methods of Construction take a placement examination. Students who do not achieve a passing grade will be required to take and pass the non-credit Introduction to Technical Communications course.

Top of Page ^

Books/Supplies

Students should anticipate an approximate cost of $450 per semester for books and supplies for a full-time, 12 credit course of study.

Top of Page ^

Protection of Privacy

Student records will not be released without the written consent of the student. Any student who wishes to examine his/her own record may do so during appropriate business hours at the Institute's Administration Office. Any student who feels that his/her right to privacy has been violated may file a complaint.

The following information (known as "Directory Information") may be released to any person in or outside the Institute without consent of the student: name, dates of attendance or current status, date of graduation, degree and major, and confirmation of birth date. If a student does not wish the above information to be released, he/she must notify the Administration Office in writing. Any such request will be honored until written notice to the contrary is received from the student.

Information other than the above items may be released outside the Institute without consent of the student in the following instances: in response to court order or subpoena, financial aid transcripts or to officials of educational accrediting agencies.

IDC may disclose education records to parents if the student is claimed as a dependent student on tax record; or if a health or safety emergency involves their son or daughter; or if the student, if under 21, has violated any law or policy concerning the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance.

Top of Page ^

Release of Records

Records will be released upon written request of the student if there is no outstanding balance of tuition or fees.

Top of Page ^

Grievance Procedure

At IDC, there are two types of grievances: informal (not in writing) and formal (in writing).  When a grievance is logged, the student is informed of the two types of grievances. 

With an informal grievance, the student seeks out an administration staff member (usually, but not always the Executive Director, Director of Communications, or Bursar) and states their grievance .  A discussion ensues with the administration who then seeks out any individuals who may be cited in the grievance (a student, instructor, or member of the administration).  If the grievance is not satisfied, the student may file a formal grievance. 

A formal grievance must be in writing.  Formal grievances are handled by the Executive Director who creates a series of questions that address the complaint, interviews those individuals cited in the complaint (so they may confirm or deny the allegations).  In some cases, individuals not cited, but have firsthand knowledge are also interviewed.  A written response is usually rendered within 30 days, but not greater than 60 days.  If the grievance is not satisfied, the student, in writing, may request a hearing.  The Executive Director forms a hearing panel consisting of an administrator, two students, and one faculty member.  Individuals selected have no involvement with the original grievance.  The parties in question are brought together to present the issue to the panel and a final decision will then be rendered. 

     

Any grievance filed against the Institute of Design and Construction should be directed to:
Vincent C. Battista, R.A.

President
141 Willoughby Street
Brooklyn, NY 11201

Top of Page ^

Cancellation of Courses

The Institute reserves the right to withdraw any course or courses due to insufficient enrollment. A full refund will be made for any tuition paid for a course that IDC withdraws.

Top of Page ^

Conduct

The Institute prohibits any conduct by student, staff or faculty that recklessly or intentionally endangers the physical or mental health of any other student, staff or faculty member. Any violator of this rule may be subject to immediate dismissal as well as subject to any applicable provisions of the Penal Law.

Top of Page ^

Drug-Free Workplace Policy

IDC strives to maintain a drug and alcohol free facility for its students and employees. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, use or possession by students or Institute employees of controlled substances or alcohol in the building, property, or facilities is prohibited. The Institute maintains a drug and alcohol awareness policy to inform students and employees of the dangers and health risks of drug and alcohol abuse. Students and employees will be informed of sanctions that will be imposed for policy violations and of the availability of drug/alcohol counseling, treatment and rehabilitation assistance. This information will be distributed yearly to all students and employees.

All students and employees are required to comply with this policy as a condition of their continued student status or employment. Any student or employee violating this policy may be required to participate satisfactorily in a substance abuse rehabilitation program and/or be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal or expulsion under applicable school policies. In addition, an employee or student convicted of any drug crime must notify the Institute within five (5) days of conviction.

Top of Page ^

Crimes on Campus

Since 2013, the following occurrences for the crimes listed below were reported to the administration office: Murder 0; Rape 0; Robbery 0; Burglary 0; Aggravated Assault 0; Motor Vehicle Theft 0: Motor Vehicle Break-in 0; Attempted Robbery 0; Sexual Harassment 0.

The number of occurrences and the number of arrests for the following crimes were reported to the administration office: Liquor law violations 0; Drug abuse violations 0; Weapons possession 0.

For the latest crime on campus statistics refer to: http://ope.ed.gov/security/ and search for Institute of Design and Construction.

The Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide upon request all campus crime statistics as reported to the United States Department of Education. The designated official for disseminating crime statistics is Elizabeth Battista at 718-855-3661. To request a copy of the crime statistics contact the Institute and a copy will be sent.

Top of Page ^

Policy on Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is a violation of Federal (Section 703 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX Education Amendments of 1972) and State (New York State Human Rights Act) Law. The Institute views all members of the college community as responsible individuals. IDC reaffirms the principle that its students, and staff, shall be free from sexual discrimination or harassment. Such discrimination or harassment will not be tolerated.

IDC has established a committee to deal with all complaints and issues of sexual discrimination and harassment. It is the purpose of the committee to ensure that any complaints are expressed, explored, and resolved promptly and confidentially.

Top of Page ^

Constitution Day Commemoration

Charters of Freedom
Library of Congress
Facts About the Constitution

 

Bias Crimes Prevention Information

Information regarding bias crimes prevention can be found on the following websites:

http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/topic.aspx?topicid=31
http://www.youthwebonline.com/everyone/hate101.html

Top of Page ^

Smoking

Smoking is not permitted anywhere on the campus.

Top of Page ^

Social Security Number

IDC does ask students to provide a Social Security number at the time of submitting an application and at registration.  IDC maintains a student record system that does not use Social Security numbers to identify an individual's record. Instead, IDC issues a school ID number for each individual student.

Top of Page ^

Attendance

The student is expected to attend every meeting of all classes for which he/she is registered. A student absent from classes for emergency reasons must inform his/her instructor of the reason for absence. If a student is absent for more than 25% of the total of a scheduled course, the student will receive an automatic grade of FA for said course.

Top of Page ^

Concurrent Enrollment

Concurrent enrollment in more than one section of the same course during a semester is not permitted.

Top of Page ^

Final Examinations

Final examinations or projects are required in all courses. No student will be excused from final examinations.

Top of Page ^

Transcripts

Upon written request, a copy of a student's academic record will be forwarded to the student or his/her designated addressee promptly by U.S. mail or other responsible agency. The student's transcript may be withheld if there are any unpaid fees or other obligations due the Institute, and the transcript may be withheld until these obligations are discharged. Academic transcripts will not be released if a student is in default of a student loan. The charge is $5.00 per transcript.

Top of Page ^

Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate with an Associate Degree in Occupational Studies, students must complete 72 credits with a cumulative average of at least 2.0 overall and 2.0 in their major.

Top of Page ^

Academic Responsibility

Candidates for an Associate Degree from IDC are expected to know the graduation requirements set forth in this publication. It is the responsibility of the student to draw up an acceptable program of study. All students must seek the counsel of an advisor.

Top of Page ^

Student Access to Educational Records

In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, students and their parents may obtain copies of the Policy Statement concerning the Act from the Administration Office or visit the U.S. Department of Education's website.

Top of Page ^

Change of Address or Telephone Number

A student must report changes of address or telephone number to the Administration Office.

Top of Page ^

 

Bulletin Changes Posted on Website

Any changes in curriculum, program, policy or procedure will be listed on IDC's web site: http://www.idc.edu.

Top of Page ^

Student Budgets

Dependent Students
Credits Tuition
(Sem.)
Tuition
(Year)
Fees (Sem.) Books/ Supplies (Year) Transportation Room/ Board Annual Total
18 $6,120 $12,240 $140 $1,000 $600 $1,000 $15,120
15 $5,100 $10,200 $140 $900 $600 $1,000 $12,980
12 $4,080 $8,160 $140 $900 $600 $1,000 $10,940
9 $3,060 $6,120 $140 $600 $450 $1,000 $8,450
6 $2,040 $4,080 $140 $400 $300 $1,000 $6,060
3 $1,020 $2,040 $140 $200 $150 $1,000 $3,670
Independent Students
Credits Tuition
(Sem.)
Tuition
(Year)
Fees (Sem.) Books/ Supplies (Year) Transportation Room/ Board Annual Total
18 $6,120 $12,240 $140 $1,000 $600 $6,000 $20,120
15 $5,100 $10,200 $140 $900 $600 $6,000 $17,980
12 $4,080 $8,160 $140 $900 $600 $6,000 $15,940
9 $3,060 $6,120 $140 $600 $450 $6,000 $13,450
6 $2,040 $4,080 $140 $400 $300 $6,000 $11,060
3 $1,020 $2,040 $140 $200 $150 $6,000 $8,670

 

Top of Page ^

Curriculum Requirements

Day / Evening Sequence: Core Requirements for All Majors
5 semesters · 72 credits

Semester 1 · 18 Credits
Course Code Course Title Credits
70 Applied Mathematics 3
68 Blueprint Reading 1 3
66 Building Materials and Methods of Construction 1 3
63 Construction Drawings 1 + 2 6
12 Specifications 3
Semester 2 · 18 Credits
23 Building Materials and Methods of Construction 2 3
60 AutoCad Level 1 3
65 Construction Drawings 3 + 4 6
37 Introduction to Design/Construction Site Safety* 3
52 Strength of Materials 3
Semester 3 · 12 Credits (Evening Classes Only)
19 Blueprint Reading 2 3
62 AutoCad Level 2 3
30 Estimating 1 3
40 Mechanical Equipment of Buildings 3

Evening Sequence: Core Requirements for All Majors
6 semesters · 72 credits

Semester 1 · 12 Credits
Course Code Course Title Credits
03 Applied Mathematics 3
18 Blueprint Reading 1 3
22 Building Materials and Methods of Construction 1 3
14 Construction Drawings 1 6
Semester 2 · 12 Credits
19 Blueprint Reading 2 3
23 Building Materials and Methods of Construction 2 3
15 Construction Drawings 2 6
52 Strength of Materials 3
Semester 3 · 12 Credits
61 AutoCad Level 1 3
16 Construction Drawings 3 3
37 Introduction to Design/Construction Site Safety* 3
12 Specifications 3
Semester 4 · 12 Credits
62 AutoCad Level 2 3
17 Construction Drawings 4 3
30 Estimating 1 3
40 Mechanical Equipment of Buildings 3

Both Day/Evening and Evening Sequence: Major Requirements

Major in Architectural Technology/Building Design
Day/Evening Sequence Semester 4 or Evening Sequence
Semester 5 · 12 Credits
Course Code Course Title Credits
04 Architectural Design 1 3
07 Architectural Detailing 1 3
45 Perspectives 3
  Elective 3
Day/Evening Sequence Semester. 5 or Evening Sequence
Semester 6 · 12 credits
05 Architectural Design 2 3
08 Architectural Detailing 2 3
10 Rendering 1 3
  Elective 3
Major in Building Construction Technology
Day/Evening Sequence Semester. 4 or Evening Sequence
Semester 5 · 12 credits
20 Construction Management 1 3
33 Green Building Design 3
57 Surveying 1 3
  Elective 3
Day/Evening Sequence Semester 5 or Evening Sequence
Semester 6 · 12 credits
21 Construction Management 2 3
31 Estimating 2 3
58 Surveying 2 3
  Elective 3

*Architectural Technology Majors take Introduction to Design and Building Construction Technology Majors take Construction Site Safety.

Top of Page ^

Course Descriptions

Applied Mathematics

Course Code 70 or 03

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course focuses on an understanding of general mathematics, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry. Various types of algebraic, geometric, and trigonometric equations are studied. Students develop an awareness of the applications of formulas and solving of equations as they relate to the construction industry.

Prerequisite: Passed placement test or Introduction to Mathematics

Architectural Design 1

Course Code 04

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Students study basic theories and principles of architectural design, coupled with historical and contemporary theories of architecture. Techniques of drawing presentations are researched and analyzed. Students develop an awareness of the major issues and current forces in technology and social perspectives of architecture. Design principles of enclosed space, fire protection, safety with respect to life and occupancy requirements of contemporary design solutions are discussed. Students are required to design, develop, and graphically present three small sized projects.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Design

Architectural Design 2

Course Code 05

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Architectural Design 1. This advanced course delves more deeply into theories and principles of design, and into contemporary issues in architecture. Students will design, develop, and graphically present three intermediate sized projects.

Prerequisite: Architectural Design 1

Architectural Detailing 1

Course Code 07

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Study of the use of materials such as wood, masonry, concrete and pre-cast concrete, and steel in the construction of buildings and their components. Students will be made aware of the intricacies and interdependency of building components and the need for the level of detail necessary to communicate clearly to the constructors of a project. Students will perfect their drafting skills and learn to produce clean, crisp, and concise details suitable for their portfolios.

Prerequisite: Construction Drawings 4

Architectural Detailing 2

Course Code 08

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Architectural Detailing 1. Students study more complicated portions of buildings. Components such as steel and concrete stairs, special drywall applications, control and expansion joints, storefront framing, cabinetry, and integration of engineering systems are examined. Students develop an ability to satisfy the Project Design within practical construction, technology and budget constraints, and produce coherent, clearly drafted component details for use by architects and contractors.

Prerequisite: Architectural Detailing 1

AutoCad Level 1

Course Code 60 or 61

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

The primary objective of this class is to familiarize the student with the basic understanding of AutoCAD and the fundamentals of 2D drafting. The first five weeks of the program will center on the basic draw and modify commands of the application. During the next five weeks, the base knowledge established in weeks one through five will be expanded to include text, dimensioning, hatching, and other more specific commands to help fine tune the students’ abilities. The remainder of the class, the students will focus on the completion of a final term project, a single family dwelling, inclusive of foundation, framing plans, exterior elevations, sections, and details.

Prerequisite: Construction Drawings 2

AutoCad Level 2

Course Code 62

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Expanding on the base knowledge established in AutoCAD Level 1, the students will be given a semester long project. The project will be a commercial building in which the students will be required to complete the full set of documents by the end of the semester. The studio will be treated as a professional office with office standards and project deadlines established by the project client. At the beginning of each week, the students will be given a brief overview of new commands or project modifications established by the client. It is the ultimate goal of the course to expand not only the students’ CAD abilities, but professional skills as well.

Prerequisite: AutoCad Level 1

 

Blueprint Reading 1

Course Code 68, 18, or 48

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course is designed to develop in students an awareness of the complexity of modern construction and its related technologies. Students will learn the skills needed to read and understand construction drawings, as well as an understanding of manufacturers' literature of component parts used in buildings. Both commercial and residential construction materials and drawings are studied. Problems encountered in design development such as site limitations, zoning restrictions, utility availability, coordination of product specifications, adherence to building codes, and life safety are explored.

Blueprint Reading 2

Course Code 19 or 79

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Blueprint Reading 1. Students learn to read, understand, and interpret the relationships of the various systems within a structure. Systems include structural, mechanical, electrical, and plumbing. Blueprint symbols, design parameters, material usage, and drawing references are examined from their architectural, engineering, and construction perspectives. Students will learn to visualize the building by integrating and coordinating the different drawings.

Prerequisite: Blueprint Reading 1

Building Materials and Methods of Construction 1

Course Code 66 or 22

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course provides a general survey of materials and methods currently used in the construction industry. History and developments, advantages and disadvantages, and the intrinsic nature of each material are examined. Appropriate uses and limitations of materials are discussed so as to integrate these materials and techniques with other aspects of construction, such as Engineering, Specifications, Value Engineering, and Estimating. Course is supplemented with manufacturers' literature, samples, and audio-visual presentations. Course follows the CSI Format of materials and building systems.

Prerequisite: Passed placement test or Introduction to Technical Communications

Building Materials and Methods of Construction 2

Course Code 23

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Building Materials and Methods of Construction 1. Course focuses on a more detailed understanding of previously presented material. Materials and systems employed in the mechanical, electrical, and plumbing industries are covered. Students learn the various technological systems and materials available in the architectural, engineering, and construction industries today, and their relationship to each other. The “how,” “why,” and “when” these systems should be employed are discussed. In addition, students are required to research and present a term project in class.

Prerequisite: Building Materials and Methods of Construction 1

Construction Drawings 1

Course Code 14

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course introduces students to drafting tools and techniques and the basic drafting of floor plans, elevations, sections, orthographic projections, and schedules. Students develop basic technical skills with an understanding of the reasons for different views and the spatial relationships in architectural drawings. Students will ultimately draft a floor plan, elevations, and sections of a simple small structure.

Construction Drawings 2

Course Code 15

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Construction Drawings 1. Students advance to intermediate drafting level and prepare a coordinated set of plans, elevations, sections, and interior details for a residence. The course develops an awareness of building components and their relationship within a structure. Site development, zoning requirements, building codes, spatial relationships, and corresponding elements are explored.

Prerequisite: Construction Drawings 1

Construction Drawings 1 + 2

Course Code 63

6 Credits, 81/4 hours per week

A combination of Construction Drawings 1 and Construction Drawings 2. See above for course descriptions.

Construction Drawings 3

Course Code 16

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Construction Drawings 2. Course focuses on the preparation of an entire but abbreviated set of architectural drawings. Structural, topographical, mechanical, and electrical drawings are explored within the interconnected character of a building. Design sketches and reference materials are used simulating architectural office procedures with the student adopting the role of drafter, coordinator, and illustrator of the designer's ideas. During the course, working drawings for a building will be produced.

Prerequisite: Construction Drawings 2

Construction Drawings 4

Course Code 17

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Construction Drawings 3. The work focuses on the preparation of the detailing phase of the building begun in Construction Drawings 3. Students become aware of the fine points of building construction, the depth of detail requirements, and the use of reference materials and importance of sketches. The course work aims to equip the student with a portfolio set of drawings.

Prerequisite: Construction Drawings 3

Construction Drawings 3 + 4

Course Code 65

6 Credits, 8 1/4 hours per week

A combination of Construction Drawings 3 and Construction Drawings 4. See above for course description.

Prerequisite: Construction Drawings 2

Construction Management 1

Course Code 20

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course presents everyday practical management of construction projects, encompassing inspections, record keeping, report development, contract documents, job safety, job site management, and responsibility centers. Course also covers the basic interfacing required to coordinate various construction trades, design aspects, building code compliance, and creating a Project Manual and its application.

Prerequisite: Specifications 1

Construction Management 2

Course Code 21

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Construction Management 1. Course expands the skills and knowledge necessary to administer, schedule, and manage a construction project. Students study the complex construction documents and legal aspects of a Construction Manager's duties and responsibilities. Course teaches an understanding of contract documents and industry terminology together with an ability to evaluate various circumstances and manage a construction project to a safe, legal, and efficient completion.

Prerequisite: Construction Management 1

Construction Site Safety

Course Code 47

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

An analysis of safety policies and procedures of a construction site. Among the topics covered will be: maintenance of the site and adjacent areas, adjoining property, excavations, erection and demolition, repairs and alteration operations, scaffolding, ramps, material handling and hoisting, explosives and blasting, explosive powered equipment, and flammable and hazardous materials. The successful completion of this course with a "C" or better results in the issuing of a 30-hour OSHA card.

Pre requisite: Blueprint Reading 1, Building Materials and Methods 1, or equivalent

Estimating 1

Course Code 30

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course teaches how to translate information in contract documents to create a material quantity estimate for a project. Students become aware of various types of computations and formulas employed in the construction industry that are required to prepare an accurate and detailed quantity estimate.

Prerequisite: Applied Mathematics and Blueprint Reading 1

Estimating 2

Course Code 31

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Estimating 1. Course focuses on the impact of the variables that exist in estimating the costs of different types of construction materials, equipment, and labor. Students develop an understanding of procedures such as take-off and unit costs and will create a total project cost from an examination of the dimensions and translation of construction documents.

Prerequisite: Estimating 1

Green Building Design

Course Code 33

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

The principles of sustainable design are discussed and reviewed and includes an overview of LEED credits. Students who complete this course successfully (“B” or better) will be eligible to take the “LEED for Green Associate” certificate examination for the United States Green Building Council.

Prerequisite: Blueprint Reading 1 and Building Materials and Method of Construction

History of Architecture

Course Code 35

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

A study of the history of architecture addressing salient features of different historical eras from ancient Egypt to present day. Course discusses cultural background of art and architecture, geography, climate, and social factors in architecture including how various social, political, religious influences, available materials and construction methods impact the evolution of various building styles and methods.

Prerequisite: Building Materials and Methods of Construction 1 and Introduction to Design

Introduction to Design

Course Code 37

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course introduces students to design as an integral part of building construction. Concepts of spatial order, hierarchy of elements, symmetry, repetition, solid/void are discussed. Historical precedents are analyzed. Students develop an understanding of buildings as functional, habitable spaces as well as places that express an idea or quality of life. One city walking tour will be held as part of the class.

Prerequisite: Construction Drawings 1

Introduction to Mathematics

Course Code 90 or 93

0 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course is for students who have not acquired the basic math skills necessary to complete the Institute's higher level courses. General math, with an introduction to the basics of algebra and geometry are taught.

Introduction to Communications

Course Code 72 or 96

0 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course is for students who have not acquired the basic reading comprehension and writing skills necessary to complete the Institute's higher level courses. Course teaches the basic reading and writing skills necessary to read and comprehend technical documents and prepare accurate, clear, professional technical communications.

Mechanical Design

Course Code 01

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course focuses on the basic theory of energy, the conservation and consumption of energy in buildings, and the basic principels of HVAC design, electrical and lighting design, and plumbing design. Building code standards that regulate building design are incorporated into the course.

Prerequisite: Mechanical Equipment of Buildings

Mechanical Equipment of Buildings

Course Code 40

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

An introductory course covering the mechanical systems of buildings. Course covers HVAC, plumbing, and electrical systems as well as types of elevators and fire protection equipment.

Prerequisite: Building Materials and Methods of Construction 1 and Blueprint Reading 1

Multiple Dwelling and Zoning Laws of NY

Course Code 42 [Fall only]

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

A study of New York State's format and interpretation of laws governing various building types, their construction, and New York City's Zoning Laws. Students will develop an awareness of and learn to read and interpret the strict requirements and constraints imposed on the construction industry by multiple dwelling and zoning laws.

Prerequisite: Building Materials and Methods of Construction 1 and Blueprint Reading 1

New York City Construction Code

Course Code 44 [Spring only]

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

New York City's Building Code and Reference Standards are studied with an objective to teach students the implications of these laws in terms of building types, uses, and construction.

Prerequisite: Building Materials and Methods of Construction 1 and Blueprint Reading 1

Perspectives

Course Code 45

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Students learn to create perspectives for rendering. Course develops an understanding of the techniques of layout, shading, shadowing and texturing, value delineation process, and an ability to clearly draft, sketch, and render elements.

Prerequisite: Construction Drawings 2

Rendering 1

Course Code 10

3 credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Students study proportion, size, quantity, quality, rhythm, harmony, selection contrast, and placing center of interest in interior and exterior renderings. Basic presentation techniques used such as line, tone, and color are examined. Students learn the use of line drawing to delineate surfaces and plane intersections, how to integrate line and tone combination techniques, design features, light and shadow into artistic architectural and interior presentations.

Prerequisite: Perspectives

Rendering 2

Course Code 11

3 credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Rendering 1. Students incorporate color media with black and white into advanced compositions to create complex professional architectural and interior renderings.

Prerequisite: Rendering 1

Revit Level 1

Course Code 82

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Introduction to Revit and Building Information Modeling (BIM).   BIM and Revit allow the creation of an intelligent 3D model capable of facilitating the design process and creating well integrated project based drawings and construction documents.  This course will introduce students to the interface and power of a BIM model and will bring students through the creation of their own BIM project.  

Prerequisite: AutoCad Level 1 and AutoCad Level 2

Revit Level 2

Course Code 83

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

The second in a series of two Revit and Building Information Modeling (BIM) courses. This class will reinforce BIM and Revit Basics and will introduce students to intermediate and advanced features of the program.  Students will work on the development of their own BIM project while continuing to look at the development of a well-integrated set of project based construction documents.

Prerequisite: Revit Level 1

Specifications

Course Code 12

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Introductory course in mastering specification writing for construction projects. Students examine the technical language and legality of different specification formats. The course teaches an ability to research and locate manufacturers' specifications relative to design and the construction industries.

Strength of Materials

Course Code 52

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Objective of the course is to develop an awareness of simple engineering design as a basic science of mechanics. Instruction focuses on simplified mechanics and strength of various construction materials such as wood, steel, and concrete. Students learn to apply theories and formulas for structural materials in the design and construction industries.

Prerequisite: Applied Mathematics

Structural Design

Course Code 56

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Course focuses on basic structural design. Students learn formulas so as to design common forms of construction in wood, steel, and concrete.

Prerequisite: Strength of Materials

Surveying 1

Course Code 57

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Introduction to basic surveying principles used to determine earth surfaces by measurements of distance, direction, and elevation. Students learn geographic methods used to describe boundaries and gain an understanding of techniques used to develop metes and bounds of property descriptions. Students gain hands-on experience with surveying instruments in the field and learn to create the necessary measurements utilized in the construction industry.

Prerequisite: Applied Mathematics and Blueprint Reading 1

Surveying 2

Course Code 58

3 Credits, 2 3/4 hours per week

Continuation of Surveying 1. Advanced surveying principles encompassing horizontal and slope distances, and vertical and horizontal angles. Students develop an awareness of various geographic controls of defined areas, an understanding of the means used to measure fixed land parameters, and an ability to integrate measurements into a comprehensive summation of surveying activities in the field. Course includes field work.

Prerequisite: Surveying 1

Top of Page ^

Seminars for Professionals

Analysis of Building Failures

1 Day

A general analysis of the structural failures in buildings and other structures.  Topics covered are visual analysis of failures, fundamental errors that affect a project, case studies of specific failures, and failure avoidance strategies.

Blueprint Reading

1 Day

A review of the basics of blueprint reading and interpretation.  Both commercial and residential construction materials and drawings are studied. Plans, sections, elevations, site plans, and schedules are discussed in detail. Problems encountered in design development such as site limitations, zoning restrictions, utility availability, adherence to building codes and life safety, and conflicts between plans and specifications are explored.

Lateral Forces

1 Day

A review of the effects of wind, lateral, and earthquake forces in both the practical and theoretical design of a structure.  Topics discussed: the nature of ground motion, critical building characteristics, structural type categories, soil structure interaction, and building size and shape configuration.

Principles of Structural Design

2 Days

A two day seminar on the basic fundamentals of structural design.  Modules include steel, wood, concrete, and foundations.  Topics discussed: materials, material properties, types of construction, structural systems, foundations, and retaining walls.

Surveying

1 Day

A course on how to set-up and use a Transit.  Instruction includes the care and safety of the equipment and the mathematics involved in making calculations. Since this course includes use of the equipment, enrollment is limited to 12 maximum.

   

Top of Page ^

 

Adjunct Faculty

Credentials

Mostaque Ahmed
B.S., University of Dhaka

M.S., University of Dhaka

Raj Autar, P.E.
B.C.E., University of Guyana
M.C.E., City College of New York
Professional Engineer

Kathleen Avino
B. Arch., Pratt Institute
University of Texas
C.C.M., New York University

Joseph T. Barna
B.A., Yale University
M.F.A., Yale University School of Drama, Technical Design and Production

Lia Dikigoropoulou, R.A.
B.Arch., University of Minnesota
M.S., Columbia University
Registered Architect

Thomas Eisele, R.A.
B.S. Arch., University of Texas
M.A., City College of New York

Registered Architect

LEED AP

William Grieshaber
Institute of Design and Construction

Andrew Haner, R.A.
B. Arch., Washington University in Saint Louis
M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Registered Architect

LEED AP

Andrew Heidig, R.A.
B. Arch., New York Institute of Technology
M.S., Columbia University
Registered Architect

LEED AP

Jeffrey Kamen, R.A.
B.A., George Washington University
M. Arch., Washington University (St. Louis)
Registered Architect

Michael Khiabani
B.S.M.E., New York Institute of Technology
New York University

 

 

Adjunct Faculty

By Program

Architectural Technology

Mostaque Ahmed

Kathleen Avino             
Joseph Barna

Lia Dikigoropoulu, R.A.
Andrew Haner, R.A.  

Andrew Heidig, R.A.

Jeffery Kamen, R.A.         
Paul King, R.A.                        

Michael Makdisi

Michael Mazzella, R.A.

John Melodia

Joseph Mucciolo, R.A.

Stuart D. Peaslee, R.A.         

Vishaal Persaud

Thomas Salerni, R.A.

Shigehiro Shishido, R.A.       

Ken Sullivan

Makis Vass, R.A.                   

Paul King, R.A.
B.S., Landscape Architecture, City Collge

B.Arch, City College

M.A., Urban Planning, City College

Registered Architect

 

Michael Makdisi
B.S., Aleppo University

M.S., Polytechnic Institute

Michael Mazzella, R.A.
B. Arch., Texas Tech University
Registered Architect

John Melodia
Institute of Design and Construction
B.F.A., Pratt Institute

Joseph Mucciolo, R.A.
Institute of Design and Construction

A.A.S., NYC Community College
B.S. Arch., New York Institute of Technology
Registered Architect

Stuart D. Peaslee, R.A.
B.F.A., University of Connecticut
M. Arch., Washington University (St. Louis)
Registered Architect

Vishaal Persaud
A.O.S., Island Drafting & Technical Institute

Thomas Salerni, R.A.
B.S., City College of New York
Registered Architect

Shigehiro Shishido, R.A.
B.S. Arch., B. Arch.,
City College of New York
M. Arch., Pratt Institute
Registered Architect

Kenneth Sullivan
A.A.S, SUNY Farmingdale

B.S., Farmingdale State University

M.B.A, Dowling College

Makis Vass, R.A.
B.S. Arch., B. Arch.,
City College of New York
M. Arch., Pratt Institute

Top of Page ^

 

 

 

Building Construction Technology

Mostaque Ahmed

Raj Autar, P.E.

Kathleen Avino             
Lia Dikigoropoulu, R.A.

Joseph Barna

Tom Eisele, R.A.

William Grieshaber

Andrew Heidig, R.A.

Mike Khiabani
Paul King, R.A.                        

Michael Makdisi

Michael Mazzella, R.A.

John Melodia

Joseph Mucciolo, R.A.         
Vishaal Persaud                

Ken Sullivan

Makis Vass, R.A.                   

 

Top of Page ^

How to get to IDC

By Subway

  • Take the B, R or Q train to the DeKalb Avenue Station
  • Take the A, C or F train to the Jay Street Station
  • Take the 2 or 3 train to the Hoyt Street Station
  • Take the 2, 3, 4 or 5 train to the Nevins Street Station
  • All of the above stations are within close walking distance of IDC

By Train

Take the Long Island Rail Road to Atlantic Terminal (Flatbush & Atlantic Avenue) and walk north along Flatbush Avenue to Willoughby Street.

By Car

Take the BQE, Brooklyn-Queens Expressway [I-278] to Exit 29 Tillary Street/Brooklyn Civic Center.  Turn left on Flatbush Avenue Ext.  Willoughby Street is the 3rd light.

Top of Page ^

Institute of Design and Construction